K1BC/WTBS


Here is a little bit of stuff about my early days at WTBS.

In the earliest days, the MIT campus radio station called itself WMIT. At some point the FCC decided that campus stations had to register their callsigns with the FCC, and WMIT was already taken. So WMIT became WTBS, the "Technology Broadcasting System". Later, as documented elsewhere, WTBS sold its callsign to Ted Turner and became WMBR. WMBR has been reported to stand for both Walker Memorial Basement Radio and Massachussetts Bay Radio. I think (denied by all who actually know the transaction) that it stands for WM B R -- William Barton Rogers -- the founder of MIT.

On this page are some pictures and some audio and notes about the program that I was most involved with during my days there in the early sixties. This page has been updated as a result of a visit that I and my partner-in-crime, George Hippisley (W2RU), made in June of 2009.


Here are a couple of those pictures, and some other, older ones.

Circa 1961 picture of WTBS Control B, showing Bob (foreground), with George (background, doing his best to look like a cross between Buddy Holly and Clark Howard) in the Announce Booth, hosting RnRMT.

Circa 1963 picture of WTBS Master Control and K1BC ("then"), later used on a WMBR T-shirt:

June 2009 picture of WMBR Master Control, showing two TTs

June 2009 picture of WMBR Control B, showing three TTs (and K1BC "now"):



The master tape of the Saturday afternoon signon of WTBS,
opening with Rock and Roll Memory Time.

With annotation.

On April 9, 2011, an event was held at the station to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the signon of the FM transmitter at WTBS. There was a party in the main hall of the building, and a special broadcast of both that part and a subsequent group of interviews from the studios. All of that was aired, and is available from the WMBR archives.
UPDATE: The recording of that event has been pruned from the archives at WMBR. I have deleted the now-obsolete link to it.
Bob Clements, K1BC
Last Updated: 2015-Jun-10